Whose Old and Confused?


Whose Old and Confused?

dziadekOne evening, two grandsons were talking to their Dziadek (grandfather) about current events.  The grandsons asked Dziadek what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general.

Dziaju (Gramps) replied, “Well, let me think a minute. I was born before television, penicillin, polio shots, frozen foods, Xerox, contact lenses, Frisbees and the pill.  There was no radar, credit cards, laser beams or ballpoint pens.

Man had not invented panty hose, air conditioners, dishwashers or clothes dryers, and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air, and man hadn’t yet walked on the moon.

Your grandmother and I got married first – and then lived together. Every family had a father and a mother. Until I was 25, I called every man older than I, ‘Sir.’ We were before gay rights, computer dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.  Our lives were governed by the Ten Commandments, good judgment, and common sense. We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong, and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.

Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege. We thought fast food was what people ate during Lent. Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins. Draft dodgers were people who closed their front doors when the evening breeze started. Timesharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends – not purchasing condominiums.

We never heard of FM radios. And I don’t ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey. If you saw anything with ‘Made in Japan’ on it, it was junk. The term ‘making out’ referred to how you did on your school exam. Pizza Hut, McDonalds, and instant coffee were unheard of.

We had five and 10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for five and 10 cents. Ice cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel. And if you didn’t want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and two postcards. You could buy a new Chevy Coupe for $600, but who could afford one?  Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon.

In my day, ‘grass’ was mowed, ‘coke’ was a cold drink, ‘pot’ was something your mother cooked in, and ‘rock music’ was your grandma’s lullaby. ‘Aids’ were helpers in the Principal’s office, ‘chip’ meant a piece of wood, ‘hardware’ was found in a hardware store, and ‘software’ wasn’t even a word. We were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby. No wonder people call us ‘old and confused’ and say there is a generation gap.”

Richard of Danbury, D.S.G.

Advertisements

About Catholic Rural Solutions

This group is for the practical application of Catholic Distributist teachings as promoted by Pope St. Pius X, Belloc, Chesterton, Maurin and others in the 20th century. This group is also a respite for traditional Catholics who adhere to the Tridentine Rite of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and who share a concern for small independent Catholic communities throughout the world. These communities while primarily small holding farmers, craftsmen and tradesman all espouse an integrated life based on Catholic Social Justice and the Sacred Magisterium of the Church. Through this we intend to inject the Distributist economic principles into the greater society. Please fell free to share your experiences in this vein. Flaming, proselytizing and persecution WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.
This entry was posted in Homestead. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s